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Tag: post operative diet

Parathyroid Scan

July 09, 2018 11:48 am

A Parathyroid scan or Sestamibi scan may be needed if the typical weight loss surgical reasons for elevated PTH levels have been addressed. Sestamibi is a small protein which is labeled with the radio-pharmaceutical technetium-99. This very mild and safe radioactive agent is injected into the veins of a patient with overactive parathyroid and is absorbed by the overactive parathyroid gland. If the parathyroid is normal it will not absorb the agent. The scan below shows the uptake of the agent.

Calcium, Vitamin D and Parathyroid hormone are routinely measured on yearly follow up for most post weight loss surgical (WLS) patients. Elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) may be caused by Vitamin D deficiency or calcium deficiency (most common in post WLS) or by over active parathyroid gland(s). In the latter case, if one of the four glands  is overactive then this is knows as a parathyroid Adenoma. If all 4 are over active and are secreting too much PTH, this is known as hyperplasia. Ultrasound of the neck, may identify an enraged parathyroid gland (adenoma) which is located behind the thyroid gland. Given the large area where the parathyroid gland may be located, additional tests are needed to not only identify the location of the gland(s) but also to distinguish between single gland (adenoma) or multiple glands (hyperplasia) cause for the elevated PTH. It is important to investigate all avenues and testing in parathyroid hormone elevation and in some cases, not to rely on one test for your diagnosis.  It is also imperative that weight loss surgical patients take their supplements routinely and consistently and have their laboratory studies followed at least yearly.

Informative Video on Vitamin D: here

 

Diet Soda, Diabetes and Weight Loss Surgery

June 14, 2016 7:02 pm

Our practice has long discouraged the consumption of diet soda and carbonated sugary beverages for anyone, but especially our weight loss surgical patients. These products’ detrimental effects on bone health, gut microbiome, increase appetite, diarrhea, inhibited weight loss and regain shouldn’t be ignored.  In addition, in the situation of limited space post Bariatric surgery, a WLS patient needs nutrient rich, protein foods.  These beverages provide no nutritional value.

soda cans
soda

In addition, these products are also not recommended for non-WLS patients.  Oral health, peak in insulin levels, increase weight gain, increased Type 2 DM, and diarrhea are also issues that can effect patients  in addition to the above issues.

Our practice, as well as a recent article on Medical News Today  Written by Jon Johnson, encourages people to:

“Saying goodbye to diet soda

Soda, whether regular or diet, is a dietary waste. Sodas have little nutrients, and have a long list of side effects. For people with diabetes, diet soda has been associated with weight gain and symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Some sweeteners in diet soda even cause sugar and insulin spikes in the blood.”

Stevia
Stevia

We encourage the use of Stevia, which is a natural sweetener, instead of other artificial sweeteners. Stevia is a herb type plant with leave that can be used for sweetening.  It has been used for many years in other countries and cultures. It contains Magnesium, Potassium, zinc, Vitamins A, B3 and C as well as fiber.

A past blog post on Carbonated Beverages and Weight loss Surgery .

Fat, Protein – Post Duodenal Switch Diet

May 23, 2016 6:43 am

Fat and Protein after weight loss surgery…. This is a subject that seems to come up all the time.

What I recommend is “…Water, protein, vitamins, supplements and every thing else….”

Dehydration can cause a lot of problems, stay hydrated.

Weight Loss Surgery (WLS) is a surgically imposed catabolic state (surgical induced starvation).  The weight is lost by not allowing enough caloric intake/absorption and forcing the body rely on stored sources of energy, mostly fat mass.  The rationale for the high protein intake is to minimize net muscle mass loss during the catabolic state.   Low carbs and low fat further push the body into catabolizing the fat mass, and reducing the net loss of protein content. As the fat mass is broken down it will release hormones and other byproducts that the body will eliminate. Hydration is crucial to every bodily function and even more so in the weight loss phase to allow for elimination of some of these byproducts.

The mechanism by which Duodenal Switch works during the weight loss phase is by limiting the caloric intake.  Long term  Duodenal Switch keeps the weight off due to the malabsorptive component as the caloric intake increases. Protein intake, Vitamin/Mineral supplementation and diligence in surveillance of vitamin/mineral levels is imperative and a life long commitment after WLS.

There are a number of different types of  Fatty Acids.  Our bodies naturally produce, from other components,  all but 2 essential fatty acids: Omega 3 and Omega 6.  Most fatty acids require bile salts to be absorbed within the small intestines.  Those are the fatty acids that are absorbed to a lesser degree after Duodenal Switch.  Medium chained fatty acids do not require bile salts and can be absorbed into the blood stream from the small intestines. Medium chained fatty acids are used for energy as they are processed in the liver. Medium chained fatty acids are actually given to patients with Short Bowel Syndrome to decrease fatty stool and increase their body weight.  This is also a possible reason some fats cause DS patients more loose stools and others do not (medium chained fatty acids). Adding fats is a purely individualized process.  Each person has a different length of small bowel, alimentary limb, common channel, percentage of excess weight to lose and metabolism. Patient’s tolerance for fat in regards to vitamin/mineral levels, stool consistency and frequency is completely individualized.

Fats and Fatty acids can be divided according to their structure in groups:

A) Saturated  Fat (animal fats, butter, lard- solid in room temperature)

B) Unsaturated Fat (liquid in room temperature)

           1-PolyUnsaturated Fats
                    a)Omega 3-fattty acids (fish, shellfish, soybean, walnut, flaxseed)
                    b)Omega 6-fatty acids (corn oil, sunflower oil)
            2-Monounsaturated fats
                    a)Omega 9-fatty acids (olive oil, avocados, peanuts, almond

The main focus in the weight loss phase should be hydration, hydration, hydration, protein, low carb, low fat and vitamin/mineral supplementation (page 22).  Rest is key in the early post op phase but gradually adding exercise is also important in ensuring the body does not breakdown muscle mass.  Adequate intake of protein and use of muscles diminishes the bodies natural response of breaking down muscle mass in a low caloric intake state.

Post Surgical Needs for the first 90 days in order of importance:
This is to allow healing to take place before adding additional stress on the body and surgical sites.
Minimum of 64 ounces of fluids daily
Minimum 80-100 grams of protein daily (protein requirements are based on ideal body weight)
30 gms by 30 days post-op
60 gms by 60 days post-op
90 gms by 90 days post-op
Vitamin/Mineral Supplements
Low carb
Low fat
Rest (early Post-op)
Exercise

Proteins are important, not only for structure (muscle) but for functions. We know that proteins and amino acids are involved in all aspects of our body’s function. This is even more critical during the rapid weight loss phase. Protein needs may increase and change based on health status, pregnancy, surgeries, healing, etc.

When it comes to fat, I do not recommend patients consuming excessive amounts of fat- At the same time I do not recommend patients go on a low fat diet.  There is this misconception that since DS is causing fat and fat soluble vitamin malabsorption, then taking more fat (in excessive amounts) can solve the problem of vitamin deficiency. How about the possibility that some patients are causing their own vitamin deficiency by taking large volumes of fat which may results in more frequent bowel movements and decreased vitamin absorption.

It is not to be forgotten that each patient will respond differently with dietary changes after duodenal switch. Some patients may tolerate more and some less fat in their diet.  After the initial 90 day post op phase I recommend that patients go slowly in adding new food items by giving it several days before adding another food item. i.e.; add carrots for 3-5 days to see how your body handles it before attempting to add another new item.  The above is not the entire weight loss process or education and is only a small portion of the education needed before undergoing any WLS procedure. These recommendation are my recommendations for my patients with the Hess technique for Duodenal Switch.

Duodenal Switch and Fat in The Diet

May 21, 2015 12:35 pm

When I perform the duodenal switch operation,  the common channel is a percentage of the total small bowel length and  I also account for the  patient’s metabolic rate. Two individuals with a BMI of 50, should not have the same common channel. If  we compare two patients, one of them is a 20 years old male who is 6’2″ and the second patient is a 60 year old female who is 5’4″, we can see how this applies. These two patients have very different metabolic needs and requirements. When the Duodenal Switch is performed in this fashion, the common channel based on a percentage of total small bowel length and metabolic needs, the patients post op diet works best when it is a well balanced, protein based diet. The basic principals are : Hydration (water), Protein and Everything else, low carb,  avoid artificial sweeteners, avoid carbonated drinks,  have frequent smaller meals and avoid processed food.  Listen to you body as to what it tolerates and what it doesn’t. This is what I recommend for my patients.

I am not aware of any scientific evidence that proves any benefit to excessive amounts of fat for DS patients who have had their length of the common and alimentary bowels based as a percentage of the total length.

My recommendation are to have a well balanced high protein diet. I do not recommend a  low fat diet, except in the healing phase after surgery.  However,  there is no reason to consume excessive amounts of fat long term.

High fat diet is used to facilitate bowel movements for some patients who have constipation. It may be prudent to try and identify what may be causing the constipation and correct or eliminate them before one resorts to a very high fat diet as a “treatment” for constipation after Duodenal Switch. The possible causes for constipation after duodenal switch may be metabolic-organic (where some patients have infrequent bowel movements before DS, hypothyroidism), length of the common and the Alimentary channels and medications (pain meds, narcotics, antidepressants).

In addition, Medium Chain Fatty Acids do not require bile salts to be absorbed and are directly absorbed into the Portal Vein in the liver. Medium Chain Fatty Acids are not malabsorbed post Duodenal Switch. Medium Chain Fatty Acids included Caproic acid, Caprylic acid, Capric acid, and Lauric acid. Commonly found in varying amounts within coconut oil and palm oil. MCT supplement is made with Medium Chain Fatty Acids.

In summary,  I recommend that Duodenal Switch patients who have had surgery with our practice have a high protein balanced diet. I do not recommend avoiding fat, or going on a low fat diet.  I am not sure if there a reason to consume excessive amount of fat, which may in fact have unexpected metabolic and nutrient consequences.

Every patient, as their weight stabilizes, will find what works and what does not work for them. Some patients will tolerate a higher fat intake and other will not be able to tolerate higher fat intake.

Bloating and Excessive Gas

April 17, 2012 7:36 am

The relationship between the consumption of food, bloating, and excessive gas is a subject that comes up frequently. In our practice, this is a complaint usually raised 3 or 4 years after receiving the duodenal switch operation. It appears that patients eventually disregard the recommendations made for a healthier diet of low carbohydrate, high protein, hydration, supplements, and then everything else.

In general, carbohydrates, carbonated drinks, artificial sweeteners (such as Splenda®, sugar alcohols, etc.), vegetables, excessive amounts of food, and an intake of fat will cause significant gas and bloating. This is not to be taken out of context and assumed that one cannot consume any of these products. However a diet that has fruits and vegetables will cause significant gas and bloating. These can not be controlled by probiotics, antibiotics, or other products such as Beano.

Simple carbohydrates/sugars (sugar, candy, cakes, cookies, pies, regular soda pop, jelly, jam, syrup, ice cream, sherbet, and sorbet, etc.) are easily absorbed. Simple carbohydrates/sugars can increase diarrhea due to the Duodenal Switch allowing more undigested sugars/fuel for intestinal bacteria to feed upon, multiply and form gas. The end result can be gas, bloating, and diarrhea.

Complex carbohydrates have more structure than simple carbohydrates/sugar which are harder for the intestinal bacteria to break down and may cause less bloating, gas and diarrhea. Also, complex carbohydrates usually contain higher fiber content.  The fiber in the colon will help to absorb water from the stool and can reduce diarrhea.  However, this is not the case for all Duodenal Switch patients.

Causes of flatulence and bowel changes
Causes of flatulence and bowel changes

When a patient reports these problems, I recommend that the consumption of all carbonated drinks should be stopped. No patient should consume carbonated drink of any sort. Artificial sweeteners should also be avoided all together. A good alternative would be honey, maple syrup or Stevia. Minimize or reduce the carbohydrate intake.

It has been our experience in the majority of cases that excessive gas and bloating is a result of dietary indiscretion. In some patients, once the dietary sources have been ruled out, it should be further evaluated by a barium enema to rule out the diagnoses of a redundant colon.

The best approach would be to first go back to a high protein and low carbohydrate. This should allow a patient to rule out any dietary sources for the bloating and excessive gas. It is recommended to next be seen by your physician for a further workup.

To summarize, when a patient has excessive amount of gas, diarrhea and bloating, the first line of treatment is elimination of all of the possible causes. These include carbohydrates, fruits, vegetables, artificial sweeteners, carbonated drinks and milk products. I can not overemphasize the importance of this step prior to anything else such as antibiotics or probiotics.