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Month: January 2016

Fluids and Electrolytes After Weight Loss Surgery

January 29, 2016 7:06 am

Fluids and Electrolytes after weight loss surgery are an important part of recovery and lifestyle after undergoing a weight loss surgical procedure. Potassium is an important electrolyte found in higher concentrations within the fluid of the cells. It is important in muscle contraction, heart rhythm, nerve function and co-enzyme function.

Fluids and Electrolytes

The following webinar (link) discusses the balance of fluids and electrolytes with particulaScreen Shot 2016-01-28 at 12.31.59 PMr attention to post weight loss surgery concerns. Deficiencies can cause heart arrhythmias, muscle weakness and cramping, intestinal paralysis, and neurological deficits.

 

The Daily Recommended Amount for Potassium is  4,700mg

Here is a list of Lower-carb potassium sources: This is not meant to be in inclusive list.  There are many higher carb sources of potassium also.

  • Beet Greens- 1/2C 655 mg
  • Trout 3oz – 375 mg
  • Salmon  719 mg per average filet
  • Halibut or Yellowfin Tuna 3oz – 500mg
  • Clams 3oz- 534 mg
  • Avocados 1 whole- 974 mg
  • Squash 1C- 325mg
  • Broccoli 1 cup 475m
  • Watermelon Radish 3 oz – 233mg
  • Sweet Potatoes- one potato 694mg
  • Yogurt 1C – 579mg
  • Tomato paste 1/4C – 342 mg
  • Whole milk 1C – 366 mg
  • Chicken breast meat 1 cup chopped – 358 mg
  • Cauliflower 1 cup raw– 303 mg
  • Peanut butter 2 T – 208 mg
  • Asparagus spears 6 – 194 m
  • Daikon Radish – 3″ – 280 mg
  • Nuts  100-300 mg per 30g / 1 oz serving, depending on the type
  • Dark leafy greens  160 mg per cup of raw, 840 mg per cooked
  • Kohlrabi 3oz- 98mg
  • Mushrooms 1 C- 273 mg
  • Spinach – 1 cup 167 mg Potassium
  • Walnuts 2 oz-250 mg

 

Sleep Apnea

January 27, 2016 8:11 am

Snoring is often viewed as an inconvenience but it can be a potentially serious issue. It may be the presenting sign of a condition known as Sleep Apnea. Unfortunately, a serious sleeping condition often gets overlooked, which can triple the risk of death for the affected! Certain signs such as consistent loud snoring, daytime fatigue, and weight gain may be indications of this serious illness.

Sleep Apnea is usually chronic issues that results in  one or more pauses in breathing during sleep. People with this disorder can repeatedly stop breathing while sleeping which usually results in a reduced oxygen supply to the brain and the tissues of the body.

Each pause in breathing is called an “apnea” and can last for several seconds to several minutes. When breathing is paused, carbon dioxide builds up in the bloodstream and chemoreceptors in the blood stream instantly respond to the high carbon dioxide levels. The brain is then signaled to wake the sleeping person and breathe in air in order to release the carbon dioxide built up. Breathing normally restores oxygen levels and the person falls asleep again.

Symptoms of Sleep Apnea:

  • Loud snoring, which is usually more prominent in obstructive sleep apnea
  • Episodes of breathing cessation during sleep witnessed by another person
  • Abrupt awakenings accompanied by shortness of breath, which more likely indicates central sleep apnea
  • Abrupt awakenings with a rapid pounding or racing heart rate
  • Awakening with a dry mouth or sore throat
  • Morning headache
  • Difficulty staying asleep (insomnia)
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness (hypersomnia)
  • Attention problems
  • Irritability

Complications of sleep apnea can result in a variety of health problems, including:

  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke
  • Arrhythmias
  • Obesity
  • Heart Problems
  • Diabetes
  • Depression
  • Headache
  • Weight Gain

Obesity can cause  a specific type of Sleep Apnea called Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common chronic disorder that often requires lifelong care.  It is well documented that daytime fatigue can be prevalent in obese patients even though they may not demonstrate symptoms of sleep apnea. However, there is strong data demonstrating the fact that obese patients run a proportionately much higher risk of having sleep apnea.

Bariatric or Weight loss surgery has been shown to be  an effective treatment for OSA in patients who are obese and often also resolves the underlying co-morbidities of sleep apnea. While scientific reasoning for this requires further study it is theorized that the weight loss is associated with a decrease in upper airway collapsibility and obstruction mostly caused by tissues size, which is one of the major causes of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Effective weight loss through bariatric surgery has helped many patients achieve complete resolution and improvement of their co-morbidities such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea. Studies show sleep investigations performed approximately one year after the bariatric surgery revealed a significant decrease in the number of “apnea” episodes per hour of sleep and an improvement in all sleep quality related measurements as well. Bariatric surgery is perfectly suited for obese patients with OSA.

The correlation between Sleep Apnea and obesity has been well documented and supported through modern science. Clinical data, medical trials, and patient testimonials all underscore major improvements in the symptoms of Sleep Apnea after bariatric surgery.

Success Story: Hasmik

January 13, 2016 2:47 pm

Failed Band: My earliest memory of feeling ashamed of being “too heavy” is from kindergarten. For over 30+ years I have struggled with  gaining weight, trying to lose weight, or going mad maintaining my weight. There is no shortcut that does not come back to bite you in the butt. There is no diet that effectively changes you permanently. For me exercise is a mindful struggle I sometimes successfully commit to over small periods of time.

I was desperate and ready for a real change. I wanted a genuine difference in the way I consumed and related to food and decided the lap band was the way to go. It was marketed as a “non intrusive, non permanent, easily reversible weight loss tool” and that is EXACTLY what I thought I needed and wanted. I was so very wrong, after my surgery I was considered a “success”. In fact up until the removal of my second slipped failed band, esophagus damage, and poor nutrition; I was considered a success. I look back and think how troubling this was/is. How very damaging to the person struggling and dealing with weight issues. Truly, it messed with my mind and my ability to speak up, admit to myself and out loud the band was NOT working for me. In fact, if I’m completely truthful, it was dangerous and turned me into a residue of the person I once was. I was not able to eat comfortably or  eat out any place I happen to be. With the Band, I would need to consider how long I was going to be away from home because I could only eat small bites in small quantities to ensure I did not get stuck or worse vomit what I put inside my mouth. Yes, I had lost almost 100 lbs, but I had given my quality of life as payment. My guilt ensured I would never speak up or complain since I felt “fortunate” and grateful to have had this second chance at life. In my mind, speaking up meant possibly losing the tool (lap band) that allowed me to change my life and reality. Because for the first time in memory, I was the same weight at the start, middle, and end of the year. I did not have to buy different sizes of clothing or underclothing. I could predict what I might wear since my size was stable and my clothes fit. The reality is and was far from this corrupted self truth. I was unhealthy with the restrictive nature of how the lap band worked. In fact my band slipped twice after a severe stomach virus. I later learned of many other symptoms I was making excuses for and quite frankly straight out ignored.

I met Dr. Keshishian (Dr. K) at my lowest weight and at the lowest point in my health. I finally realized, the lap band needed to come out after it had slipped again. It was clear I needed a doctor who would be straight with me and cared for my health and not his/her “success” rates and have the expertise to deal with my failed band. I researched and called several bariatric surgeons then attempted to make appointments with each to discuss the urgent band removal surgery I needed (not as simple as you would think). I was also hopeful I might have the option to undergo the bariatric sleeve surgery because I knew I would not be able to keep my weight under control on my own.  I was unwilling to undergo the emotional and mental torment of gaining and losing weight for the rest of my days. I succeeded in making three appointments and truthfully after meeting and speaking to Dr. K and his office staff I canceled them immediately. Let me start with the staff as that REALLY is important; they help you feel comfortable with the doctor, the procedure, and overall experience. They represent and reflect how the doctor you’re about to see will treat his patients. The expected standard within Dr. Keshishian’s office immediately made me feel like I called the right place. I was taken by the knowledgable, kind tone and efficient manner in which they requested the necessary information to effectively help me get from the starting point to the end goal. When I got to my appointment, Dr. Keshishian BLEW MY MIND. He not only presented himself as an approachable person I  immediately felt at ease with but also reveal my concerns and questions.  He treated me like a person. This may sound strange but this doctor made me feel like a human being with real concerns. He listened to me, asked questions rather than talked at me, and explained how and what was happening to my body and mind. He spent 3 hours with me to answer all my questions (even if I repeated them), draw diagrams, show me video to better help me understand what was happening, and then just sat with me while I cried for a moment. I cried because my 30+ years journey of ups and downs, crazy and insanity finally led me to the door of a man who understood and knew how to help without judgment. WHICH DOCTOR DOES THIS! None that I know.

My life post surgery is what I always hoped it would be. I am able to eat vegetables, leafy greens, fruit, grains and basically a well rounded diet. What’s amazing is that I naturally do not crave sweets, heavy creamy dressings, sauces and fill up quickly. There is after all a difference between the restriction of a lap band and the feeling of being full with the sleeve which Dr. K patiently explained. Today I am able to go any where,  at any time, enjoy the moment and the company rather than worry about what I’m not able to consume. My days of scanning to locate the nearest bathroom in case I need to dash to it are over.

As I write this today, I feel like a real person, not some transient hoping to savor my life at glimpses. I am a person that is balanced in my heart with the average person’s anxiety and mindful eating habits. The sleeve is not a magic end to weight gain, it does give you the fighting chance to make choices in life leading up to results you’re willing to work for.

~ Grateful and Mindful, Hasmik (September 2015 Sleeve Op Patient)

Incisional Hernia

January 08, 2016 10:16 am

After any type of abdominal surgery there is an inherent weakness or defect in the abdominal wall due to the incision that can lead to Incisional Hernia. Some weaknesses or defects can be present from birth or develop over a period of time. If the Incisional Hernia defect is large enough, abdominal contents such as the bowels, may protrude through the defect causing a lump or bulge felt by the patient. Hernias develop at certain sites which have a natural tendency to be weak; the groin, umbilicus (belly button), and previous surgical incisions.

Think of your hernia as a bulge in a tire. The outer wall of the tire is like your abdominal wall. The inner tube of the tire is like your intestines (Figure 1).Screen Shot 2016-01-05 at 1.22.26 PM

 

 

Most of the time the outer wall of the tire is strong enough to hold the inner tube, but if the wall weakens, a bulge may occur (Figure 2).

Screen Shot 2016-01-05 at 1.22.38 PM

Just like a hernia may form in a weakness in the abdominal wall (Figure 3).Screen Shot 2016-01-05 at 1.22.50 PM

What does a hernia feel like?

A hernia can be both seen and felt. You may notice it as a lump in your abdomen or groin that may or may not disappear when you lie down. You also may be aware of a dull aching sensation that becomes more pronounced when you are active.

Will my hernia go away?

An untreated hernia will not get better on its own, although it may not get worse for months or even years. A hernia that can be easily pushed back or flattened (reducible hernia) is generally not an immediate danger to your health, although it can be painful. A non-reducible hernia, however, can become life-threatening if part of the intestine gets trapped, or strangulated, in the opening. This is also called an incarcerated hernia and is an emergency situation that may require immediate surgery.

Why should hernia be repaired?

Hernias should be repaired for several reasons. Once a hernia has developed, it will tend to enlarge and cause discomfort. If a loop of bowel gets caught in the hernia, it may become obstructed or the bowels’ blood supply may be cut off. This could then become a life-threatening situation. Most hernias can be repaired effectively.

Why does a incisional hernia hurt?

The discomfort you feel, especially when you cough, lift something heavy, or stand for a long time, comes from the constant pressure of tissue pushing its way through the weakened spot in your body. As more tissue pushes through the weakened area, the feeling of pressure increases. A hernia that develops or worsens quickly can produce a sudden intense pain as it enlarges.

What can I do to feel better?

Limiting activity or eliminating excess weight may provide temporary relief. Wearing a truss or binder has also offered temporary relief. The only cure for an incisional hernia, however, is surgery. There are two reasons for hernia surgery: to correct or prevent a dangerous strangulated hernia, and to eliminate the pain that may be interfering with your normal activity. Although there are always risks and side effects associated with surgery, today’s surgical techniques provide patients with treatment options that offer minimal post-operative discomfort, speedy recovery, and lasting relief.

The repair of a hernia depends on the size of the hernia. The standard method of hernia repair involves making an incision in the abdominal wall. Normal healthy tissues are cut until the area of weakness is found. This area, the hernia, is then repaired with sutures. Often a prosthetic material such as  mesh, another plastic or biological material is sutured in place to strengthen the area and close the defect. Finally, the skin and other healthy tissues that were cut during the initial incision are sutured back together to complete the repair. Video of Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair here.